The "Van Meer" Technique to Scar Closing

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St Louis, MO
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#1
This technique was shared w/ me a short while ago in regards to possibly help w/ the closing of possible scars on this rather large maple that I have from Growing Grounds, seen here:

http://www.bonsainut.com/threads/acer-pal-newest-addition.24722/

Does anyone have experience w/ the Van Meer technique? If so, any thoughts or feelings about it? Has anyone tried it on Maples? Here is a link about the process:

http://ofbonsai.org/techniques/styles-and-styling/the-van-meer-technique


Seems to logically make sense and the article appears to show some nice work. Any thoughts Nutters?
 

MACH5

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#6
I have not tried this. Then again, I have not found a good reason why to do so. Although a very cool technique and idea, I think you need near surgical precision to pull it off. Even if you are successful, I wonder how nicely it will heal? It seems to me that this is worth trying, more to flaunt your own horticultural technical bravado, than really needing to this over more traditional methods for healing wounds.

I definitely would try this on a piece of cheap material first!
 
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#8
The nice thing is that if you attempt it and it doesn't work you can still cut flush because the technique relies on making the first cut higher up on the tree/limb.
 
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#9
I saw this technique, and then tried to modify it a bit for my coast redwood. Instead of cutting flaps of bark, I took a whorl near my chop site and carved the wood away behind it. After that, I bent the whorl over and stapled it to the top of the chop site and cut pasted over it. The constant rain has washed away most of my cut paste, so I need to reapply. My plan is to use the excessive budding from the whorl to heal the wound more quickly. If I did it more neatly, I could probably have kept more of the cambium intact, but a month after chopping I have high hopes for my experiment.

IMG_0947.JPG
 
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New Jersey
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#10
I have not tried this. Then again, I have not found a good reason why to do so. Although a very cool technique and idea, I think you need near surgical precision to pull it off. Even if you are successful, I wonder how nicely it will heal? It seems to me that this is worth trying, more to flaunt your own horticultural technical bravado, than really needing to this over more traditional methods for healing wounds.

I definitely would try this on a piece of cheap material first!
Is there a thread I could reference for the traditional method of healing large wounds. I also was interested in trying this on my Sharps pygmy but I think It may be too precise for my level . I was planning on removing two large branches. Your experience on the Maple threads is greatly appreciated.
 

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#11
There have been a number of threads on B-nut about the subject. Search 'Van Meer Technique". I have tried it a couple of times with no success. I have tried to follow other's experience with it. I don't think anyone has had great success with it.
 
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#13
Agreed. I just found a thread on seaweed extract and foil tape. Looks promising.
Two methods that i have used that work well are bridge grafting across the large cut ( approach ) and thread grafting a branch or two near the edge of the area to close. Easy to remove and heal over after the fact. Re-exciting the live edge, using cut paste and protective foil will speed the process as well. It also helps to stage the branch cut with a stub first, allowing the tree to adjust, then returning in a month or two to cut the stub off and prepare the wound properly for closing. Smooth final cut, slightly concave with sharp edges. If using a sealant, then only a thin coat. If it is a maple i use alcohol on the cut just prior to sealing.
Of course the ideal is if a small branch was kept in the area to use for when the larger branch would be removed.
Always a good practise on developing trees to keep buds, small branches until you are sure they will not be needed. Particularly lower down on the design.
Just providing information, not commenting on what others choose to do or believe.
 
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#14
Thanks for the information. I appreciate your patience. I understand the idea of leaving a slightly concave wound. Do you make your final cut at the branch collar or flush with the tree. In my case the wound would be on the outside curve of the trunk line. I've seen some who leave this raised area on the trunk however the wound area is smaller in this instance.
 
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#15
Thanks for the information. I appreciate your patience. I understand the idea of leaving a slightly concave wound. Do you make your final cut at the branch collar or flush with the tree. In my case the wound would be on the outside curve of the trunk line. I've seen some who leave this raised area on the trunk however the wound area is smaller in this instance.
My approach after the stub cut is to carve a bit larger wound taking care to reduce the collar area as much as possible and create a smoother transition for healing and final appearance. This is partly a matter of personal taste and experience based on the fact some species tend to form thicker bumps when the collar is left. Keep in mind that you can do this in stages over time if you are concerned about leaving to large an area immediately. I have at least two favourite sayings. TTT. Things take Time.
And TDIITD. The Devil is in the details.;)
 

MACH5

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#16
Is there a thread I could reference for the traditional method of healing large wounds. I also was interested in trying this on my Sharps pygmy but I think It may be too precise for my level . I was planning on removing two large branches. Your experience on the Maple threads is greatly appreciated.

Johnny, here is one: https://moonlightbonsai.wordpress.com/2018/03/05/japanese-maples-and-healing-large-wounds/

The Van Meer technique seems that it works but I do question the end result and how good it looks after it is all healed. Have not seen more than one (maybe two examples) of its results. It seems to require near surgical precision for it to work. That's first step. Then hope it all heals well and looks natural.