The time is now, for this Maple

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Belgium
#21
I think you've done a great job letting this one get strong. I like the virtual of @AlainK and @BobbyLane (maybe without the branch in the inside of the curve). The nebari is somewhat oddly shaped and would go better with the image of BobbyLane. The development of the nebari would dictate what to do with it. Try to improve it as much as you can while the tree is full power. That would be my first concern. Airlayering is an option to keep in mind if you want to make it better and enhance the low movement. I would repot, look if you are happy with the development of the base. Put it on a board or layer it in mid spring. For the cutback, i do the big cuts most often in fall or summer since sap loss is minimal at that time.
 

M. Frary

Bonsai Godzilla
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Mio Michigan
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4
#24
I like Bobby's idea but lose the lowest branch.
As for the wire across the root,I wouldn't worry too much. If it starts to bite in cut it. The tree will have enough roots to hold the tree by then.
I like this tree a bit. So what if the taper is negligible. You could grow a decent tree without chopping it back.
 

JudyB

Imperial Masterpiece
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#25
These are two totally different approaches between Alain and Bobby. If you can't decide, then perhaps this is the year to airlayer and get rid of branching that doesn't work for either scenario. Better to wait to do a radical reduction if you don't have a direction for development, and work on other areas while you think on it.
 
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Kalkaska, MI
USDA Zone
4b
#27
I gave up on worrying about wiring the roots, i keep scaring up the roots/trunk. I just tie down or set rocks on the ones i repot now. I suppose they could be knocked over, but i haven't had much issue the last few years.
 
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Essex, UK, Zone 8
#28
I like Bobby's idea but lose the lowest branch.
As for the wire across the root,I wouldn't worry too much. If it starts to bite in cut it. The tree will have enough roots to hold the tree by then.
I like this tree a bit. So what if the taper is negligible. You could grow a decent tree without chopping it back.
Thanks Mike :).

These are two totally different approaches between Alain and Bobby. If you can't decide, then perhaps this is the year to airlayer and get rid of branching that doesn't work for either scenario. Better to wait to do a radical reduction if you don't have a direction for development, and work on other areas while you think on it.
Good idea, thank you. I will have a good look at it shortly and see where the moment takes me. Although not that experienced, I still think simply looking at the tree in front of me, will spur on ideas and action.
 
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Essex, UK, Zone 8
#29
ConorDash, I love where this one is going. Reminds me of my favorite tree, that gorgeous Kashima by Mach5!
I gave up on worrying about wiring the roots, i keep scaring up the roots/trunk. I just tie down or set rocks on the ones i repot now. I suppose they could be knocked over, but i haven't had much issue the last few years.
Thanks guys. I’ll take a look at the wire, if there’s even the slightest indication that it’s overly tight, then I’ll remove it but I’ll probabky leave it. I don’t think it’s doing any damage.
 
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#31
So what's the plan Conor?
I think, now I’ve got your guys’ thiughts and opinions, I’ll get the tree in front of me and look at it properly. Weigh things up.
At the very least, if I don’t do anything major, I can thin out the crown to let more light in and remove branches which are obviously bad + where multiple are growing from same spot.
I’m more on side of Bobby’s approach.

That low branch, I feel removing it would give the trunk a better appearance, a smooth trunk all the way up. But at same time, it’s a big of a rule breaker in my mind and most people don’t like it, which makes me like it lol. I’d love to thicken it up so it can bring out the canopy but I think it’d take a long long time to do that...

What do you think of this immediate plan?
One thing for sure, I gotta man up and not be afraid.
 
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#33
someone said remove the branch on the inside curve....i still dont see this branch, i dont see any guidlines being broken here correct me if im wrong. the low branches on the left are not rule breakers from my knowledge. i believe you are being told to remove them solely for design purposes.
 
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#34
ConorDash, I love where this one is going. Reminds me of my favorite tree, that gorgeous Kashima by Mach5!
That particular tree has a low...ish left branch situated like the one on conar's tree https://www.bonsainut.com/threads/kashima-maple.22311/

now if you were to go informal upright, which is still a decent call, i would still consider the yellow lines as the tempo setters for this material, especially if going for a more interesting asymmetrical design rather than the bog standard pattern someone posted. just my thoughts. use the tree to its full potential


i took an asymmetrical approach with my hornbeam
IMG_6496
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

the material gives you those options to maximise such traits

you need to know what youre doing and 'why' youre doing it.
personally, i wouldnt bother with ground layering because i believe not every tree has to have an outstanding nebari. in future though, just buy better material where the basics are already in place.
i wonder if you could cover some of the right root or tilt the tree to the right a tad so the flare at the base is more balanced, might help the overall image. maybe in the growing season you could try dressing the surface in spag moss and making some precise cuts around the base and you may induce some new roots.
 
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#36
That particular tree has a low...ish left branch situated like the one on conar's tree https://www.bonsainut.com/threads/kashima-maple.22311/

now if you were to go informal upright, which is still a decent call, i would still consider the yellow lines as the tempo setters for this material, especially if going for a more interesting asymmetrical design rather than the bog standard pattern someone posted. just my thoughts. use the tree to its full potential


i took an asymmetrical approach with my hornbeam
IMG_6496
by Bobby Lane, on Flickr

the material gives you those options to maximise such traits

you need to know what youre doing and 'why' youre doing it.
personally, i wouldnt bother with ground layering because i believe not every tree has to have an outstanding nebari. in future though, just buy better material where the basics are already in place.
i wonder if you could cover some of the right root or tilt the tree to the right a tad so the flare at the base is more balanced, might help the overall image. maybe in the growing season you could try dressing the surface in spag moss and making some precise cuts around the base and you may induce some new roots.
I could certainly try the rooting with moss. It can’t hurt. I do already have it all covered with moss though. I like it with moss covering the surface. I believe it’s improved it’s health and in hotter months, the benefits are good.

I will have a good look at it soon :). Thank you.
I will bear in mind why I’m cutting each branch, as I do it. Otherwise I am just senselessly pruning.