Taxus Resource Thread

just.wing.it

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,225
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6,809
Location
Blips and Chitz (mid MD, 6b...ish)
USDA Zone
6B
#1
I know there are a few of us Yew lovers out here...
I think we should make this a Dedicated Thread for any solid information you have, and would like to share with the Bnut universe, about Taxus.
(@sorce maybe you can tag this as a "Resource"...or whatever you do...
😉)

If you have something to post about Taxus, begin with a small title, like "Collection", or "Repotting", or "Fertilizing", or "Placement", or ....you get the idea.

_____________________________________

I'll start with what sparked my idea for this post, something I learned the hard way this spring...

Wiring Taxus:
Wiring is best done in late spring or summer.
The earlier you wire, the sooner the branches will hold their position.
I've wired new growth in late spring and removed said wire in late autumn, and branches are set.
*The biggest thing to avoid is wiring small branches (less than 4mm thick) in winter.*
I did some minor detail wiring in late December and it looks like every single branch I wired is dead now.
It may be possible to safely wire larger branches in winter, with raffia, but I still recommend summertime.
 
Messages
963
Likes
1,662
Location
Ohio
USDA Zone
6
#3
Who starts a thread on April 16th about Taxus?
Nah, I'm with Yew... I've just dug a 35yr old foundation plant from my house to make room for another project.
Unfortunately I've no use full information to pass along. I'm just hoping to learn more about the plants I hated as a kid. Parents have a HUGE hedgerow of these I used to have to trim.
IMG_20180228_134059738.jpg
 

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Messages
165
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137
Location
Asheville, NC
USDA Zone
7a
#6
Yew-wood-dust is toxic. Don’t breef.
All parts of a yew plant are toxic to humans with the exception of the yew berries (however, their seeds are toxic); additionally, male and monoecious yews in this genus release cytotoxic pollen, which can cause headaches, lethargy, aching joints, itching, and skin rashes; it is also a trigger for asthma. Be careful what you collect and keep away from kid and pets.
 
#8
I'm just hoping to learn more about the plants I hated as a kid.
I can understand the distaste some have for yew... they are kind of ubiquitous in landscapes ... I recently repotted a yew and since it was up close to our back door (for post-repot protection) , my wife noticed it (she’s fairly uninterested in my trees) and said “I generally hate those types of bushes, but I like the way the trunk looks’... pretty good compliment I think!!

Here’s a pic... not the best image, but it’s kind of dark under the overhang....

5AB38F12-0FAD-41C9-968F-C3F330929C68.jpeg
 
Messages
111
Likes
7
Location
N Georgia
#9
I just picked up aa yew from a nursery had been left for years had to cut main root off with a saw slipped into a grow box for now. How much of the present growth be removed to promote back budding.
 
Messages
486
Likes
660
Location
N/E Illinois
USDA Zone
5b
#10
I can understand the distaste some have for yew... they are kind of ubiquitous in landscapes ... I recently repotted a yew and since it was up close to our back door (for post-repot protection) , my wife noticed it (she’s fairly uninterested in my trees) and said “I generally hate those types of bushes, but I like the way the trunk looks’... pretty good compliment I think!!

Here’s a pic... not the best image, but it’s kind of dark under the overhang....

View attachment 188702
I think post-war suburban landscape material, for the eastern united states, is our greatest untapped resource of "yamadori". Imagine how many millions of yew and other hedges are out there with fantastic bones. We don't know it, because they are so "common and boring".

Probably what natives of Croatia thought about the sheep-bitten hornbeams nobody noticed for god-knows-how-long.
 
#11
I think post-war suburban landscape material, for the eastern united states, is our greatest untapped resource of "yamadori". Imagine how many millions of yew and other hedges are out there with fantastic bones. We don't know it, because they are so "common and boring".
Agreed! many a time waiting at red lights has been spent peaking under the foliage with envy at the massive trunks below! Or, more excruciating is when you drive by a place where you have admired potential material to see the whole hedgerow cut down to ground level or ripped out!
 
#12
I just picked up aa yew from a nursery had been left for years had to cut main root off with a saw slipped into a grow box for now. How much of the present growth be removed to promote back budding.
Not having seen it, I would guess that the root ball was amazingly tight and dried out... getting that teased out was probably enough for one period of time. If it were mine, I would leave the foliage on, as is, so that it can regenerate below the soil line.