table top saw

Dav4

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#2
A circular saw would work, as would a table saw built into a table, maybe even a chop saw. Cutting long planks can be a pain without the right tool or experience as they can be hard to cut straight (and safely) without the right set up. Have you ever used any of the above?
 
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#4
A circular saw would work, as would a table saw built into a table, maybe even a chop saw. Cutting long planks can be a pain without the right tool or experience as they can be hard to cut straight (and safely) without the right set up. Have you ever used any of the above?
I'm looking to start making my own cedar plant boxes. Looking for recommendations on small table top saws.

Thanks.
I like a chop saw - I've got one that can do a six inch width board and can adjust to miter any angle. I would recommend this above anything else - totally idiot proof compared to almost anything else.
 

Dav4

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#5
I like a chop saw - I've got one that can do a six inch width board and can adjust to miter any angle. I would recommend this above anything else - totally idiot proof compared to almost anything else.
I've got a nice contractor's saw, a circular saw, a reciprocating saw, even a 14" band saw... but no chop saw! Maybe for my coming birthday... hoping for a 12"er:).
 
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#7
I like a chop saw - I've got one that can do a six inch width board and can adjust to miter any angle. I would recommend this above anything else - totally idiot proof compared to almost anything else.
Of course you would recommend a chop saw. why not a choppy choppy saw. :D

but I would go with the same I have a craftsman saw like he describes that can do miters.
 
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#14
A chop saw (mitre saw) is very easy to use for cross cutting lumber to length. Its also relatively portable, if that's important to you.

But, if you ever need to rip (slice a board lengthwise) a chop saw is useless. While a table saw is less portable, and cross cuts aren't as quick or easy with one, I find it the more useful tool in the long run as it can rip, and crosscut.

If you will never need to cut down a 1" x 8" into two 1" x 4"s, then go with the chopper, as @choppychoppy says.
CW
 

Dav4

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#15
thats the biggest cross cut sled ive ever seen. makes me wanna give you the extra miter saw out in my garage :)
I built that one right after I acquired the saw 15 years ago. I guess you could say it's overbuilt:D, but it's still as easy and effective to use as when it was built... I can cross cut a board 12" x 2" x 12' and it still slides like butter.

... and I can quickly rip planks 24" long in it, too. Like @CWTurner said, you can't do that with a chop saw.


...still want one, though;).