1. I'm looking to start making my own cedar plant boxes. Looking for recommendations on small table top saws.

    Thanks.
     
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  3. Dav4

    Dav4 Imperial Masterpiece

    A circular saw would work, as would a table saw built into a table, maybe even a chop saw. Cutting long planks can be a pain without the right tool or experience as they can be hard to cut straight (and safely) without the right set up. Have you ever used any of the above?
     
  4. sorce

    sorce Nonsense Rascal

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    In Scottsville.... Capture+_2018-01-12-07-06-31.png

    Don't buy the shit Chicago electric one!

    Sorce
     

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  5. choppychoppy

    choppychoppy Shohin

    Messages:
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    I like a chop saw - I've got one that can do a six inch width board and can adjust to miter any angle. I would recommend this above anything else - totally idiot proof compared to almost anything else.
     
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  6. Dav4

    Dav4 Imperial Masterpiece

    I've got a nice contractor's saw, a circular saw, a reciprocating saw, even a 14" band saw... but no chop saw! Maybe for my coming birthday... hoping for a 12"er:).
     
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  7. Anthony

    Anthony Masterpiece

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  8. Of course you would recommend a chop saw. why not a choppy choppy saw. :D

    but I would go with the same I have a craftsman saw like he describes that can do miters.
     
  9. Vin

    Vin Masterpiece

    I use a chop saw for mine and recommend the same to you.

    Grow Box.JPG
     
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  10. choppychoppy

    choppychoppy Shohin

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    I've got a circular and reciprocating as well lol - I've got too much stuff :(
     
  11. Dav4

    Dav4 Imperial Masterpiece

    My set up for cutting long planks and dimensional lumber. My jig is bulky, but it cuts a 90° angle every time:)
    EAA508C0-4B33-40D2-9EE3-D148D6F6D329.jpeg A12E4BA2-B927-4BB0-AE0B-F0AB2DF2584A.jpeg
     
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  12. Bonsaifurliife

    Bonsaifurliife Sapling

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    I like the chop saw too. IMG_1444.JPG
     
  13. choppychoppy

    choppychoppy Shohin

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  14. watchndsky

    watchndsky Chumono

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    thats the biggest cross cut sled ive ever seen. makes me wanna give you the extra miter saw out in my garage :)
     
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  15. CWTurner

    CWTurner Chumono

    Messages:
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    A chop saw (mitre saw) is very easy to use for cross cutting lumber to length. Its also relatively portable, if that's important to you.

    But, if you ever need to rip (slice a board lengthwise) a chop saw is useless. While a table saw is less portable, and cross cuts aren't as quick or easy with one, I find it the more useful tool in the long run as it can rip, and crosscut.

    If you will never need to cut down a 1" x 8" into two 1" x 4"s, then go with the chopper, as @choppychoppy says.
    CW
     
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  16. Dav4

    Dav4 Imperial Masterpiece

    I built that one right after I acquired the saw 15 years ago. I guess you could say it's overbuilt:D, but it's still as easy and effective to use as when it was built... I can cross cut a board 12" x 2" x 12' and it still slides like butter.

    ... and I can quickly rip planks 24" long in it, too. Like @CWTurner said, you can't do that with a chop saw.


    ...still want one, though;).
     
  17. Gdy2000

    Gdy2000 Mame

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  18. Bonsaifurliife

    Bonsaifurliife Sapling

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  19. Dav4

    Dav4 Imperial Masterpiece

    You don't rip with it. If you're planning to rip planks or sheets of lumbar, a table saw is the way to go, though a circular saw will do in a pinch.
     
    Gary McCarthy likes this.
  20. Thanks Dave.

    I've been thinking about a circular saw. But I thought with having to do rip cuts as well that a small table would be a little easier.
     

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