Pitch Pine second flush

Paradox

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#1
I experimented with one of my pitch pines a couple of weeks ago and candle pruned some of its candles.

Ive noticed my JBP forming buds already so I checked the pitch pine

and it is also forming second buds below the cut candle. Pic is a bit blurry because of zooming in but you can see it.

SecondBuds_small.jpg
 

Paradox

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#5
Those buds will open this year and extend?
Or is it just setting buds for next year?
Good question and yea its actually too early to tell.
Its the first time I tried this so I guess we will see.
But it did respond like a JBP and started some new buds.
People have speculated that Pitch pine were 2 flush which is why I figured I would try it.
 

Paradox

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#8
Why did you leave that much candle when you cut it? Just curious. I didnt know if there was a reason.
I followed the procedure for doing candle cutting all at once rather than stages over 3 weeks.

You leave a longer stub on strong areas and shorter on weak areas. The theory being that the auxin signal to produce buds takes longer when the stub is longer.
This gives the weak areas a jump start on producing buds and new candles so those areas can become stronger.
 
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#10
I imagine location would be a factor, in Georgia it may be a 2 flush pine, in Mike Frary's northern Michigan cool short summers it may barely get a single flush of growth.

So far in my zone 5 they seem single flush, but I have not done any candle pruning. They are young seedling and I am not paying close attention. So time will tell.
 
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#13
Is that what a pitch pine candle always looks like? I had the same type of candles in a few locations on my black pine and they were essentially a reversion back to juvenile growth. Is this a different form of say, adventitious young growth? @Wilson ?
 

Paradox

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#14
Is that what a pitch pine candle always looks like? I had the same type of candles in a few locations on my black pine and they were essentially a reversion back to juvenile growth. Is this a different form of say, adventitious young growth? @Wilson ?
Not entirely sure what you are asking. These candles are typical from the normal spring candles as far as I can tell except that they are not spring candles.
There is no distiction between "juninile growth" on pines like there is on junipers. Yes this is different from adventitious young growth or needle buds as we call them.

There has been some speculation as to whether Pitch pine are truely 2 flush pines and that you can treat them like JBP. Some other growers have said such. I decided to test it for myself on my own pitch pines.

I decandled the pine in July: I cut off the spring candles. It formed buds and they grew into new candles like JBP does.
 
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#18
I'll be looking into this.
They are very easy to grow from seed. I'm considering collecting some more seeds this fall. If I do and you are interested I'll send some your way.

They are vigorous growers. Most of the seedling I started 4 years ago are just over a half inch in diameter and about 2' tall. They are fully container grown. I would bet they would be over an inch if they were in the ground.

Pitch pines are one of the only pines that can be trunk chopped to below foliage and survive. I'm not sure I would have the nerve to try it though.
 
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#20
Not entirely sure what you are asking. These candles are typical from the normal spring candles as far as I can tell except that they are not spring candles.
There is no distiction between "juninile growth" on pines like there is on junipers. Yes this is different from adventitious young growth or needle buds as we call them.

There has been some speculation as to whether Pitch pine are truely 2 flush pines and that you can treat them like JBP. Some other growers have said such. I decided to test it for myself on my own pitch pines.

I decandled the pine in July: I cut off the spring candles. It formed buds and they grew into new candles like JBP does.
I have heard in multiple videos and explanations of multi-flush pines that those long extensions with thick, on-regular needles are juvenile growth. When you cut, did you leave a portion of the first flush? A set of needles or so? I only ask because I have the same looking growth on my JBP, and when I presented it to people, they said it was this juvenile growth I had heard about.