Barbados Cherry Nursery stuff

Mashu

Seedling
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Location
Virginia
#1
I bought this Babardos Cherry from my favorite local nursery recently. Got home and put it in a bit of a nicer pot I found at a goodwill. I gave it an initial styling and let it grow out some before taking the second picture. What do you guys think? I'm new to this whole bonsai thing and am always open to criticism. Also, when do these typically start to flower?
IMG_20171231_160507_729.jpg 20180212_151104.jpg
 
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Location
on the IL-WI border, a mile from ''da Lake''
USDA Zone
5b
#4
Very nice.
I would let it grow this year. Don't do any serious pruning, except to maybe bring it back inside its current silhouette. Just focus on keeping it healthy.

Next year, when it is time to repot, I would pot it lower into the media. This is a young plant, you want to keep the surface roots buried until they are much larger. You have a very nice full nebari, it will be great, if buried for a few more years. If you expose the nebari too soon, the tree won't thicken those surface roots, it will use lower roots that are well buried instead. So keep your nebari buried until the tree is 5 or more years older. Then you can expose the nebari and you will have nice fat roots like an old tree.

In a year take a bunch of pictures, you should have many more branches, then you will have more to choose from, and we can help you plan a style for it. Right now, don't prune much, you want to keep all options open. Just get it growing vigorously. Get it happy enough to give you a few cherries to taste.
 

Mashu

Seedling
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Location
Virginia
#6
Very nice.
I would let it grow this year. Don't do any serious pruning, except to maybe bring it back inside its current silhouette. Just focus on keeping it healthy.
I'm really excited to see how this tree will develop in the coming years. I definitely got too overzealous with revealing the surface roots. That is, however, one thing I've noticed about these younger Barbados Cherries. They tend to have fairly decent surface roots even from a young age.
 
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80
Location
Orlando, FL
USDA Zone
9B
#9
@bonsai-ben ,

I think that is the edible cherry, not the punicifolia.
Have one down here that might be 8 inches across, the edible cherry.
Good Day
Anthony
To be blunt, I've had the tree one week, so the latin part truly escapes my knowledge. ;) I've not even tagged databased it in the system yet........ The cherries are edible. It was imported after collection in Puerto Rico in the late 80s and in a pot since.

Tastes a lot better than the Surinams! :) :) :)
 
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Location
Pasadena, MD
USDA Zone
7A
#10
Looks real nice.

Let the tree enjoy life outside when it gets warm (I guess consistently above 60 degrees - maybe someone will know for sure.) I'm writing to tell you that when it goes outside to introduce the tree gradually to the sun. Start in shade introducing to more light over the course of several weeks. Don't just place it in full sun right away.
 
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Location
São Paulo, Brazil
USDA Zone
11a
#11
I bought this Babardos Cherry from my favorite local nursery recently. Got home and put it in a bit of a nicer pot I found at a goodwill.
Very nice, I have one here that grows incredibly fast.
One question though, how many holes in the bottom of this new pot? I ask because I was given a similar pot as a present, but...
With no drainage holes in it!
 

Mashu

Seedling
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Location
Virginia
#12
Very nice, I have one here that grows incredibly fast.
One question though, how many holes in the bottom of this new pot? I ask because I was given a similar pot as a present, but...
With no drainage holes in it!
Yeah, it definitely has drainage holes! I tried potting a plant into a pot with no drainage holes once and in a day, the soil was covered in mold and other fungi. I'll surely never make that mistake again!