PDA

View Full Version : How to get drastic taper without major trunk chops?



timhanson81
February 24th, 2010, 12:55 PM
Recently I started searching google with kanji characters and have been drooling over the beautiful trees on many of the Japanese sites. I have been particularly impressed with the heavily tapering shohin without any large trunk/sacrifice branch chop scars.

I understand the general methods of giving taper through trunk chops, but how do you develop a tree such as the one pictured? I am assuming they are grown in pots, as field growing would result in too course growth. Is it just a matter of continued pinching out of the leaders over many years? OR am I just missing the chop scars somewhere?

Based on the rough translation, I think this Japanese Maple is 14cm high with a 8.5cm base.

Thanks for any insight,
Tim

Bill S
February 24th, 2010, 01:25 PM
Good question Tim, too bad too that Gary aka King Kong never gave us an answer, before he was banned, because he did all but swear that is the only way he did his trees.

Haven't heard an explanation, but my thoughts are that you have to keep the lower branches strong and grow them for building the lower trunk, whilst keeping the apex pruned back hard constantly. Adding a section at a time. My guess is that this adds many years to the time frame for this type of tree.

Klytus
February 24th, 2010, 02:00 PM
I guess Kong would say foliar feeding and obsessing about soil water,i would like to know which.

ovation22
February 24th, 2010, 02:03 PM
I would say air layer off a larger tree. Hard to get a thick trunk without thick roots, thick branches, and/or chop scars otherwise.

jkl
February 24th, 2010, 02:51 PM
Those trees are the results of many trunk chops. I'd guess they're at least 10 years old, probably much older. They're trident maples, so chop scars (which undoubtedly are in the back somewhere) are covered up quite rapidly. They may well have been started by air layers or cuttings, but they got that shape via a series of trunk chops.

There are no shortcuts. Sorry.

Bonsai Nut
February 24th, 2010, 03:07 PM
The thread where some of this discussion that people are referring to started is the tropical Siam Bonsai thread (http://www.bonsainut.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1702) from about a year ago.

http://www.bonsainut.com/images/neb13.jpg

Basically development included a combination of trunk chops (on top) while repotting and spreading the roots over a cone-shaped frame (similar to field planting on top of a plate to spread roots). In some cases the roots were actually woven so they fused into a beautiful, symmetrical base. Note how in the photo above you can see the roots actually originate well above the ground line. The nebari (flare) is actually created by a cone-shaped root mass (not the trunk). You can ready more about the process here:

Siam Bonsai Development (http://www.siambonsai.com/tip1.html)

Not sure the same process could be used to generate the small tree in this thread. I would tend to agree that air-layering would be the fastest method, but otherwise chop and grow is the only way I know.

capnk
February 24th, 2010, 03:10 PM
This tree may also have been grown by the technique of starting with several seedlings bound together. Perhaps through a tile. I can see evidence of branch (or perhaps trunk) cuts.

shohin kid
February 24th, 2010, 04:18 PM
My guess is that you have to be good a healing scars. :)

cquinn
February 24th, 2010, 04:36 PM
The technique is in Peter Adam's book.

Brian Van Fleet
February 24th, 2010, 05:04 PM
I circled what appears to be one trunk chop on this Japanese Maple. BT has articles about growing these short fat things...mostly grown on a tile and allowing one apex to extend at a time and shortening it before it gets too heavy to require a big chop. LOTS of spraying with lime sulfur helps keep the trunk evenly colored, which disguises much of the work.

Brian Van Fleet
February 24th, 2010, 05:06 PM
Circled in yellow...

Juniperus Californica
February 24th, 2010, 05:18 PM
Why don't you try using Trident Maple whips, wrap them around a base and let them fuse together. Check out this web site and see how it's done:

http://www.dugzbonsai.com/tridenttrunk.htm

JC

Smoke
February 24th, 2010, 06:04 PM
Recently I started searching google with kanji characters and have been drooling over the beautiful trees on many of the Japanese sites. I have been particularly impressed with the heavily tapering shohin without any large trunk/sacrifice branch chop scars.


Thanks for any insight,
Tim

First of all when dealing with developing massive taper as in these exagerated trunks on these maples, one has to know the time frame with dealing with such things. If you expect to have a scarless trunk in two seasons than making trees like this is not going to happen for you.

If making trees like this with massive taper and you are willing to put ten years into it then one can get to this with no visable chops at all. It just takes time...not that much but enough to erase the chops. They will dissolve away and become invisable over time.

This small mame trident was built the same as the article I posted here a few months back. The base of the tree is two inches across and the tree is 4.5 inches tall. No scars showing. This will be a nice tree in about 5 more years as I build a new canopy.

Smoke
February 24th, 2010, 06:05 PM
When I turn the tree around we can see that there are still no scars.

Smoke
February 24th, 2010, 06:12 PM
There are three trunk chops in the back of the tree. The three are marked in red.

The fourth chop is on the top of the tree.

The fifth chop will take place in about 4 months as the leader expands. It will be taken to the bottom bud on that leader. First it has to grow to "tapering" size before chopping. This is why I have chops of differing size on the tree. First chop small. Second chop larger. Third chop even larger. This was to develop trunk girth, so they had to remain longer to do their job.

(the red circles are just a referance and are not the size of the chops, the first chop was only about 3/8 inch across. The chops and scars got larger as the tree increased in size.)

timhanson81
February 24th, 2010, 11:33 PM
Thanks everyone for the replies!

As a plant biologist, I enjoy the propagation and development of stock just as much as maintenance of "finished" trees. I have lots of projects going with many aimed at creating these short and fat little trees. I wired 50 japanese maple whips to a mame sized frame recently to try that technique out. We'll see how that works. Next year I'll try a few more with Trident maples. I don't think air-layering would really help much to get something like this. Any layered apex is going to take a lot of work to add that much taper, and any other portion of the trunk which is layered will still require some sort of large chop.

I definitely realize there are no shortcuts to developing material like this. I just find it hard to believe that you could grow a Japanese maple like this without modifying the standard trunk chop procedures somehow. Maybe it is just a matter of more but smaller chops over time. I am under the impression that Japanese maples take longer and don't heal over chops as nicely as Trident maples.

Al- So that tree was reduced from tall nursery stock like the others you posted? How many years ago did you make the first chop? It definitely has potential to be a great little tree!

Brian- Does the lime sulfur just give everything a uniform color and erase any discoloration of the scars, or does it do more that that?

Tim

Smoke
February 24th, 2010, 11:56 PM
Thanks everyone for the replies!

As a plant biologist, I enjoy the propagation and development of stock just as much as maintenance of "finished" trees. I have lots of projects going with many aimed at creating these short and fat little trees. I wired 50 japanese maple whips to a mame sized frame recently to try that technique out. We'll see how that works. Next year I'll try a few more with Trident maples. I don't think air-layering would really help much to get something like this. Any layered apex is going to take a lot of work to add that much taper, and any other portion of the trunk which is layered will still require some sort of large chop.

I definitely realize there are no shortcuts to developing material like this. I just find it hard to believe that you could grow a Japanese maple like this without modifying the standard trunk chop procedures somehow. Maybe it is just a matter of more but smaller chops over time. I am under the impression that Japanese maples take longer and don't heal over chops as nicely as Trident maples.

Al- So that tree was reduced from tall nursery stock like the others you posted? How many years ago did you make the first chop? It definitely has potential to be a great little tree!

Brian- Does the lime sulfur just give everything a uniform color and erase any discoloration of the scars, or does it do more that that?

Tim

That tree was started (chopped) four years ago. I have many tridents in all phases of chopdom and experimenting. I am experimenting with drilling out the live center of a trunk and making a long triangle cut down the trunk and pulling together the two halves and make a cone. Sort of like Doug Phillips but not over a form and no seedlings to graft together.

Yes mountain maples take longer to heal over and unscarred trunks in Japan are worth a fortune when they are done right. Great shohin maple trees that are really worth anything have been in training for 30 or more years. Most of the really great maples seen at Gafu-Ten are well over 40 years or more. These below( I took photos of the photos from my Gafu book from last year) are all over 50 years old. The maple with autumn leaves is a shishigashishira

Smoke
February 24th, 2010, 11:58 PM
One last one...

Smoke
February 25th, 2010, 12:07 AM
Thanks everyone for the replies!

I don't think air-layering would really help much to get something like this. Any layered apex is going to take a lot of work to add that much taper, and any other portion of the trunk which is layered will still require some sort of large chop.



Tim

Funny you would mention this as this book I photoed for this post has English translation as well as Japanese. Virtually all of the maples in this book (there are about 75 maples in it) are started from air layer.

The photo's you posted of the turtleback maples, the only way to get those is by air layering. It is started on a large maple mother tree and a suitable branch with good movement is selected and the air layer is made in a circle around the branch. The roots grow and the layer is removed. It is grown out and the branch is allowed to grow stretching the "turtle" back to a mound. A seedling is thread grafted thru the turtle back and training begins on that while the original branch is removed after graft takes.

I know it's hard to tell but thats the way it's done. It's all in the healing.

JRob
February 25th, 2010, 03:24 AM
Tim,

If you go to Morton Albek's site, (Shohin-bonsai europe) just under his banner is a link to his method for developing the type of shohin bonsai maples you are discussing. (I have two in process using his technique in this article). In one several of the pictures you can see the trunk chop and the healing process that has taken place and over time it will become barely noticeable. It is a wonderful article and has been very helpful to me in developing my two trees.

Best of luck,

JRob

shohin kid
February 25th, 2010, 04:59 AM
The link he is refering to: http://www.shohin-europe.com/ALBEKGALLERY-acer-2.html

jkl
February 25th, 2010, 05:36 AM
I circled what appears to be one trunk chop on this Japanese Maple. BT has articles about growing these short fat things...mostly grown on a tile and allowing one apex to extend at a time and shortening it before it gets too heavy to require a big chop. LOTS of spraying with lime sulfur helps keep the trunk evenly colored, which disguises much of the work.


I'd bet there are many more chops than that hidden inside that tree.

These trees are much too small to have been developed by fusing a batch of whips together, a process in itself that is VERY time consuming. It also is less likely to produce nice trunks than the traditional means. Folks who tout it only show their successes.

I personally find those tipi-shaped trees to be very unnatural looking.

Brian Van Fleet
February 25th, 2010, 06:10 AM
In Japan, lime sulfur is used in the winter as a dormant-season fungicide and insecticide. I think the dilution rate is 1:100, and it has the added effect of bleaching the trunk a little at a time. Notice how most of the Japanese d-trees, whether they're beech, hornbeam, J. maple, T. maple all have a similar color to the trunk? Additionally, used straight (or tinted with ink) and painted onto deadwood, it will bleach out the deadwood and also act as a preservative. In both cases, the effect is cumulative.

rockm
February 25th, 2010, 06:28 AM
This tree looks to me to be one big repeated trunk (or branch) chop. The bark's texture to me, looks like scar tissue.

I'm not a real fan of this kind of exaggerated tiny tree...

Actually, the shape and texture brought to my mind the image of stuff you find in the grass around a dog park...honest. I'm not trying to be insulting, it's just what popped (or pooped) into my head when I initially saw the picture. I'm a long time dog owner and have been picking the stuff up for so long, the image may unfortunately be stuck in my head ;-)

jkl
February 25th, 2010, 07:00 AM
In Japan, lime sulfur is used in the winter as a dormant-season fungicide and insecticide. I think the dilution rate is 1:100,

Here too. That is the primary purpose of lime sulfur. However, the dilution varies depending on its intended use and time of year (label). I've used it that way for 20 years on bonsai and on fruit trees and other shrubs. Its "preventative-ness" is fairly limited -- especially as a pesticide.


and it has the added effect of bleaching the trunk a little at a time. Notice how most of the Japanese d-trees, whether they're beech, hornbeam, J. maple, T. maple all have a similar color to the trunk?

I have to differ here. LS used in such dilute ratios will have little or no effect on the color of the bark. That requires full strength application. Those trees all have naturally smooth light bark -- in pots and in the woods. The Japanese use it on trees with dark bark, too and you see nothing different in bark color. I've seen no color change on my trees, either -- whether in the yard, orchard, or bonsai tables.


Additionally, used straight (or tinted with ink) and painted onto deadwood, it will bleach out the deadwood and also act as a preservative. In both cases, the effect is cumulative.

The long-term "preservative" value of lime sulfur is vastly overstated. It will kill wood-rotting fungus at the surface and on contact, and perhaps for a week or so afterward. If rot exists under the surface of the deadwood it will continue to work away at he tree. Beyond a few weeks, its effects are nominal -- at best. Lime sulfur, if not applied annually, washes off the deadwood in time.

Attila Soos
February 25th, 2010, 10:08 AM
I'm a long time dog owner and have been picking the stuff up for so long, the image may unfortunately be stuck in my head ;-)

But because of your bonsai training, I am sure that you can appreciate when you see great movement and character in them.....:D:D

Same here, picking up those things is my second job..

Brian Van Fleet
February 25th, 2010, 11:12 AM
Here too. That is the primary purpose of lime sulfur. However, the dilution varies depending on its intended use and time of year (label). I've used it that way for 20 years on bonsai and on fruit trees and other shrubs. Its "preventative-ness" is fairly limited -- especially as a pesticide.



I have to differ here. LS used in such dilute ratios will have little or no effect on the color of the bark. That requires full strength application. Those trees all have naturally smooth light bark -- in pots and in the woods. The Japanese use it on trees with dark bark, too and you see nothing different in bark color. I've seen no color change on my trees, either -- whether in the yard, orchard, or bonsai tables.



The long-term "preservative" value of lime sulfur is vastly overstated. It will kill wood-rotting fungus at the surface and on contact, and perhaps for a week or so afterward. If rot exists under the surface of the deadwood it will continue to work away at he tree. Beyond a few weeks, its effects are nominal -- at best. Lime sulfur, if not applied annually, washes off the deadwood in time.

Each person brings his or her unique experience to the forum...just sharing my experience and studies; which is also reflected in the quality of my trees. Quoting and refuting posts line by line isn't exactly ingratiating...but it is good to have a new member with experience on the forum.

Klytus
February 25th, 2010, 11:59 AM
Maybe the cut paste used had some effect.

rockm
February 26th, 2010, 06:21 AM
"But because of your bonsai training, I am sure that you can appreciate when you see great movement and character in them....."

"Movement" Heheheh, Beavis...:D

Bonsai Nut
February 26th, 2010, 08:52 AM
"But because of your bonsai training, I am sure that you can appreciate when you see great movement and character in them....."

"Movement" Heheheh, Beavis...:D

I like the way that they appear to rise up from the bowels of the earth :)

JasonG
February 26th, 2010, 08:59 AM
That little maple is a stunner! I would welcome a tree of 1/2 that quality on my bench anytime! Amazing tree.

Jason

Bonsaichef
February 7th, 2011, 09:42 AM
There are scars there just well aged and fully healed. Here are some pics of how it's done for shohin in the field.
With the smaller one the tapered trunk can be constructed in a Chinese colander over the course of 5 seasons using good feeding & pruning appropriately.
CB

Dr.GreenThumb
February 7th, 2011, 11:30 AM
Wow Impressive !

Smoke
February 7th, 2011, 03:45 PM
...or... you can read this article.

http://bonsainut.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3149

Bonsaichef
February 7th, 2011, 08:28 PM
I think we should quest to produce the best possible quality. There are many way to skin the cat. I find field growing is the best for my situation. It is a five to seven year cycle with predictable outcome. Here is another field picture.

milehigh_7
February 7th, 2011, 09:42 PM
I think we should quest to produce the best possible quality. There are many way to skin the cat. I find field growing is the best for my situation. It is a five to seven year cycle with predictable outcome. Here is another field picture.

You may be right chef, however I have seen how Smoke's work comes out. It seems fairly predictable and usually passable (tongue in cheek).


I don't believe I have seen your finished product or the entire story of how you achieve it. I would like to see it so please start a thread and chronicle your 5-7 year cycle. It would be good to learn different methods.

Thanks!

Alain BERTRAND
February 8th, 2011, 12:16 AM
I second that. Your work is very promising, I wish you explain more.

Bonsaichef
February 8th, 2011, 10:27 PM
I will start to compile data to chronicle my trees this spring. I have many very large trident maple. This particular plant has been my hobbie for 20 years. I also live in Louisiana so we have a long growing season which these Acer like.
This week I will start 11 root over rock (real Ibigawa stone from a friend in Japan) using the Japanese tradesman grafting technique.
These will range from 10"-22" & various forms to boot.
BC

Bonsaichef
February 8th, 2011, 10:29 PM
Also, Bonsai Today # 23 was my inspiration...read it.
BC

I am not here to be a "Forum Warrior" I am not the world's best bonsai artist nor do I think I am. This is a hobby that I have been doing for 2/3 of my life. I joined this board to learn, share my ideas & experiences nothing more. Smoke your work looks good, you have a good eye. I do things the old fashioned way I don't grow branches until the wounds are healed. I don't worry about ramification until my nebari is well on it's way...........like I said I'm old school. The only thing I am really good at is making large interesting trunks & will listing some for sale this fall.
BC

Smoke
February 8th, 2011, 10:40 PM
This name and text seems vaguely familier......

Bonsaichef
February 8th, 2011, 11:38 PM
I can assure you don't know me. Although if you play your cards right you might.
I'm not moving in on your trident turf SMOKE so chillout.....althought I do grow some nice ones>>>>

Bonsaichef
February 8th, 2011, 11:39 PM
PM me for my name so you can Google me if you like.

milehigh_7
February 8th, 2011, 11:43 PM
*giggle* love the "new blood"! I still want to see your techniques documented chef... Smoke is kind enough to share what he knows with those of us who don't know. I would love it if you would do the same.

Bonsaichef
February 8th, 2011, 11:47 PM
I said I will compile the information & post it in a new thread. This will take some time but don't fear I will pm you. \BC

Bonsaichef
February 9th, 2011, 12:11 AM
Here it is, simple stupid.
The key is to be patient.
Branches & ramification are the endgame. There are many obstacles to overcome before the fun begins.
As you will notice we all have a tendency to rush it, as this is human nature. The old saying life is a journey not a destination applies to bonsai very well.
The thickening is really aided by copious amounts of sacrifice branches wired perpendicular & let grow freely in the lower 2/3 of the tree. Only during the formation of the final apex do you use these branches in the upper 1/3. They are used to close the wounds & make the taper more convincing. (review other picture I post)
BC

Dav4
February 9th, 2011, 03:34 AM
This name and text seems vaguely familier......

Yeah, ...he was a vendor on ebay, if I recall. Not sure if it's the same guy, though.

mcpesq817
February 9th, 2011, 06:25 AM
Here it is, simple stupid.
The key is to be patient.
Branches & ramification are the endgame. There are many obstacles to overcome before the fun begins.
As you will notice we all have a tendency to rush it, as this is human nature. The old saying life is a journey not a destination applies to bonsai very well.
The thickening is really aided by copious amounts of sacrifice branches wired perpendicular & let grow freely in the lower 2/3 of the tree. Only during the formation of the final apex do you use these branches in the upper 1/3. They are used to close the wounds & make the taper more convincing. (review other picture I post)
BC

Hi BC, thanks for sharing your growing out practice with us. Just out of curiosity, on the second page, why do you arrange the roots in a whirlpool shape?

JTGJr25
February 9th, 2011, 08:07 AM
BC, it is very kind of you to share your technique and I have a few questions about nailing the roots to the board. First, what wood do you use for your board? Second, do you put the nails through the roots or do you put them next to the roots to serve more as a guide that forces the roots? Also do you worry about removing the nails or do you let the roots grow to the point to where they engulf the nails so you cant tell they were there?

Thanks again as I am very interested in what you are sharing.

Tom

Bonsaichef
February 9th, 2011, 08:43 AM
Vendor on ebay I have never been (Dav4 get a life, no offense), I have way too much going on in my life. It's really comical how some people on this site are acting. Like I said I'm not here to steal anyone's "Message Board Thunder" just to share Information & Learn.

Thanks JTJr25 & mcpesq817.
Answers:

1. I arrange the roots like that just to add character, they will fuse down the road

2. The nails I use are like pushpin type with a wide head so they will hold the roots more like a guide

3. The nails will rust away so no need remove

4. For the wood I use 1/2" whatever I have, it to will decompose in time

I will be documenting this entire process this year to share with you all.
Thanks for the questions.
BC

mcpesq817
February 9th, 2011, 08:55 AM
Thanks for the clarification BC - looking forward to your future posts.

JTGJr25
February 9th, 2011, 09:28 AM
Thanks a lot for the clarification. Your method seems very logical to me and your results look promising so far. I plan on trying this in the future.


Tom

bwaynef
February 9th, 2011, 10:10 AM
Vendor on ebay I have never been (Dav4 get a life, no offense), I have way too much going on in my life. It's really comical how some people on this site are acting. Like I said I'm not here to steal anyone's "Message Board Thunder" just to share Information & Learn.


This thread might enlighten you as to many reactions here:
http://bonsainut.com/forums/showthread.php?t=588&highlight=Chef+Dave

Dav4
February 9th, 2011, 10:13 AM
Vendor on ebay I have never been (Dav4 get a life, no offense), I have way too much going on in my life. It's really comical how some people on this site are acting. Like I said I'm not here to steal anyone's "Message Board Thunder" just to share Information & Learn.

BC

A bit touchy there. Let me fill you in what might be going on. Back in the days of Bonsai talk, there was this guy who frequented the site that went by Bonsaichef, or something like that. He was a real piece of work. Via the internet and Ebay, he screwed people out of alot of money. Now, I'm not saying you and he are the same, but the internet is crawling with losers trying to scam people. You've been on Bnut less then a week. In the few posts you've made, you've shown pics of growbeds with great, fat trunks, and hinted that some of them are for sale, or will be. hmmmmmm. By the way, I've got a life...I don't need to screw people over to make a few bucks (no offense).

Dav4
February 9th, 2011, 10:32 AM
Wayne, you rock...Chef Dave!!! Of course!

John Kirby
February 9th, 2011, 12:09 PM
Kong, Kong, Kong, the beast is called forth from the tropical jungles........

Bonsaichef
February 9th, 2011, 04:49 PM
Well my name is not Dave sorry & no these trees are not for sale.
Later this year I might sell 1-3 trees, money is not my thing as my balance sheet is solid so I don't have to sell any.
If you like call Dana @ Brussel's and ask him if I'm legit(PM for my name). I operate well know restaurants in the great state of Louisiana as I said before. (Dave4 Get a Life)
BC

Dav4
February 9th, 2011, 05:25 PM
Well my name is not Dave sorry & no these trees are not for sale.
Later this year I might sell 1-3 trees, money is not my thing as my balance sheet is solid so I don't have to sell any.
If you like call Dana @ Brussel's and ask him if I'm legit(PM for my name). I operate well know restaurants in the great state of Louisiana as I said before. (Dave4 Get a Life)
BC

Whatever, Chef Dave or Shannon or whoever you are. It's heartening to know that you're flush with cash and don't have to screw people out of their hard earned money ...that's great and I'm happy for you. Just to be clear, though, you've been on this site for less then 3 days and you're portraying yourself; 1) as someone who has been practicing bonsai for 2/3 of their life (some might consider that to be an expert, though I wouldn't get that from the diagrams you provided...Yikes!), and 2) a source of descent trident stock to be purchased. Also, your username is similar to a low life from another bonsai forum who screwed more then a couple of people under the premise of selling tridents. Finally, you have trouble typing/writing which was chef dave's cross to bear as well. I know, it's probably all coincidence:rolleyes:. Either that, or you are truly a moron. Anyway, I'm not going to google your name or call Brussells...I'm going to sit back and watch. Besides, I really enjoy reading your posts...they're absolutely brimming with cutting edge techniques I'd never heard of. Keep up the good work, Chef!

Smoke
February 9th, 2011, 05:47 PM
Wow! this is really getting good.

I made one teeeny reference and looky where we are now.

Terrific!

Mr. Chef, I have no thunder to steal... post away I am enjoying whatever happens. Why does anyone have to Pm you for a name? Why can't you use it here. Everyone knows who I am. I been around for 15 years on the forums, since '97..... I have left a wake behind me.

Al Keppler

Bonsaichef
February 9th, 2011, 05:49 PM
Whatever, Chef Dave or Shannon or whoever you are. It's heartening to know that you're flush with cash and don't have to screw people out of their hard earned money ...that's great and I'm happy for you. Just to be clear, though, you've been on this site for less then 3 days and you're portraying yourself; 1) as someone who has been practicing bonsai for 2/3 of their life (some might consider that to be an expert, though I wouldn't get that from the diagrams you provided...Yikes!), and 2) a source of descent trident stock to be purchased. Also, your username is similar to a low life from another bonsai forum who screwed more then a couple of people under the premise of selling tridents, and you have trouble typing/writing. I know, it's probably all coincidence:rolleyes:. Either that, or you are truly a moron. Anyway, I'm not going to google your name or call Brussells...I'm going to sit back and watch. Besides, I really enjoy reading your posts...they're absolutely brimming with cutting edge techniques I'd never heard of. Keep up the good work, Chef!


No not an expert & no I don't want to sell anyone here trees & yes I don't need the cash. The drawings; I am also not an artist with a pen I think my point was conveyed properly. I don't wish to rub you the wrong way but I guess I do. I will not be pushed around by you so perhaps we should end this here. Do you hear yourself "your username is similar to someone else" repeat that three times and tell me how it sounds. You look like someone I don't like so therefore I must not like you either.....that's just really uneducated & small minded way of thinking/acting.
1. I don't want to sell trees
2. I have never been a member of any bonsai forum (now I see why)
3. I have never insinuated/stated/professed/imagined to be an "bonsai expert & or savant with a pen"
4. Sharing thoughts & learning are the only reasons I thought I wanted to be here, but this is ridiculous.
BC

Dav4
February 9th, 2011, 06:04 PM
It's all good, Chef. I'm done here, too...just gonna watch now. Keep posting, please, and let everyone else come to their own conclusions about all this.

Bonsaichef
February 9th, 2011, 06:12 PM
Thank you....


It's all good, Chef. I'm done here, too...just gonna watch now. Keep posting, please, and let everyone else come to their own conclusions about all this.

buddhamonk
February 9th, 2011, 08:08 PM
wow growing trees on a tile or piece of wood. This is revolutionary!!!

Although I love how one third of your total post count (#12) are essentially aimed at pissing people off --> Nice way to get started on a new forum.

milehigh_7
February 9th, 2011, 08:40 PM
wow growing trees on a tile or piece of wood. This is revolutionary!!!

Although I love how one third of your total post count (#12) are essentially aimed at pissing people off --> Nice way to get started on a new forum.

The way I see it, he will fit right in! LOL!

buddhamonk
February 9th, 2011, 08:57 PM
The way I see it, he will fit right in! LOL!

Oh yeah!!! :)

BTW I googled myself and apparently I am an exemplary citizen...

PeterW
February 10th, 2011, 12:01 AM
Long time no post.. hope this little tree fits in this topic.

This is a Port Jackson fig tree. It was collected by a friend in approximately 1980 as about what resembled a thumb, i am told. It has been in a small pot ever since and only ever cut back to a small trunk. I purchased this tree only a few months ago, about 6 months or so. It has no scars whatsoever on the trunk as it was only ever kept with short growth. It is approximately 25 cm tall (10") and the base is 20cm (10") across. Long time to wait, is it worth the wait......matter of opinion i guess.

october
February 10th, 2011, 01:00 PM
Hello PeterW
I like this ficus... It pulls off the Sumo like style well. I especially like the tree without the leaves..

Rob